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2002 Society Honors and Awards

The Society’s honors program has as its basic objective the advancement of the engineering profession by emphasizing exceptionally meritorious achievement. ASCE is proud to recognize the recipients of its 2002 honors and awards.

  Norman Medal
  J. James R. Croes Medal
  Arthur M. Wellington Prize
  State-of-the-Art of Civil Engineering Award
  Harold R. Peyton Award for Cold Regions Engineering
  CAN-AM Civil Engineering Amity Award
  Computing in Civil Engineering Award
  Construction Management Award
  Thomas Fitch Rowland Prize
  Theodore von Karman Medal
  Nathan M. Newmark Medal
  Alfred M. Freudenthal Medal
  Simon W. Freese Environmental Engineering Award
  Samuel Arnold Greeley Award
  Rudolph Hering Medal
  Wesley W. Horner Award
  Wilbur S. Smith Award
  Francis C. Turner Lecture
  Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award
  Charles Martin Duke Lifeline Earthquake Engineering Award
  Stephen D. Bechtel Pipeline Engineering Award
  Surveying and Mapping Award
  Harland Bartholomew Award
  Ven Te Chow Award
  Hunter Rouse Hydraulic Engineering Lecture
  Royce J. Tipton Award
  Arid Lands Hydraulic Engineering Award
  Karl Emil Hilgard Hydraulic Prize
  Hydraulic Structures Medal
  Hans Albert Einstein Award
  Julian Hinds Award
  International Coastal Engineering Award
  Ralph B. Peck Award
  H. Bolton Seed Medal
  Karl Terzaghi Lecture
  Thomas A. Middlebrooks Award
  Martin S. Kapp Foundation Engineering Award
  Arthur Casagrande Professional Development Award
  Ernest E. Howard Award
  Jack E. Cermak Medal
  Shortridge Hardesty Award
  T.Y. Lin Award
  Moisseiff Award
  Raymond C. Reese Research Prize
  George Winter Award
  Richard R. Torrens Award
  Excellence in Journalism Award
  Daniel W. Mead Prize for Students
  Robert Ridgway Student Chapter Award
  Collingwood Prize
  Daniel W. Mead Prize for Younger Members
  Edmund Friedman Young Engineer Award for Professional Achievement
  Younger Member Group Award
  Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize
  Alfred Noble Prize
  Civil Government Award
  John I. Parcel–Leif J. Sverdrup Civil Engineering Management Award
  Edmund Friedman Professional Recognition Award
  Civil Engineering History and Heritage Award
  William H. Wisely American Civil Engineer Award
  ASCE Presidents’ Award
  ASCE President’s Medal
  Hoover Medal
  Roebling Award

Norman Medal

 
El-Tawil


Deierlein


Sherif El-Tawil and Gregory G. Deierlein are the winners of the Norman Medal for their papers “Nonlinear Analysis of Mixed Steel-Concrete Frames. I: Element Formulation” and “Nonlinear Analysis of Mixed Steel-Concrete Frames. II: Implementation and Verification,” which appeared in the June 2001 issue of the Journal of Structural Engineering. The Norman Medal is bestowed upon the author or authors of a paper that is judged worthy of special commendation for its merit as a contribution to engineering science. These two papers describe the formulation, computer implementation, and calibration of a flexibility-based beam-column element to simulate the response of such elements to the combined effects of axial loading and biaxial bending. They are an outgrowth of a project sponsored by the National Science Foundation to investigate the seismic design and behavior of composite steel-concrete structures. El-Tawil is a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Central Florida. His previous honors include the TIP Teaching Award, the Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award, and the Josephine de Karman Award. Deierlein is a professor at Stanford University. He received a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1990 and is a former winner of ASCE’s Raymond C. Reese Research Prize and its State-of-the-Art of Civil Engineering Award. He won the Norman Medal once before, in 1994.


J. James R. Croes Medal

Shiohara
 

Hitoshi Shiohara is the winner of the J. James R. Croes Medal for his paper “New Model for Shear Failure of RC Interior Beam-Column Connections,” which appeared in the February 2001 issue of the Journal of Structural Engineering. The J. James R. Croes Medal is presented to the author or authors of the paper judged next in order of merit to the paper recognized with the Norman Medal. Shiohara’s paper describes the substantial discrepancy between the behavior observed in tests and that provided by existing mechanical models for shear failure adopted by current design codes for reinforced-concrete monolithic interior beam-column connections. It also proposes a mathematical model for the shear failure of the beam-column connections. Shiohara is an associate professor in the architecture department at the University of Tokyo. In 1987 he received the Japan Concrete Institute’s Award for Outstanding Research Paper for his work “Plastic Analysis for Ultimate Strength of Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls.”


Arthur M. Wellington Prize

Lopes


Fallon


Rutherford


Hiatt


Thomas J. Lopes, James D. Fallon, David W. Rutherford, and Michael H. Hiatt win this year’s Arthur M. Wellington Prize for their paper “Volatile Organic Compounds in Storm Water from a Parking Lot,” which appeared in the December 2000 issue of the Journal of Environmental Engineering. The Wellington prize is awarded to the author or authors of a paper on foundations, on land, water, or air transportation, or on related subjects. Lopes is a supervisory hydrologist for the U.S. Geological Survey in Carson City, Nevada. In addition, he is leading a statewide study on the vulnerability of groundwater to anthropogenic contaminants. Fallon is a supervisory hydrologist for the U.S. Geological Survey in Mounds View, Minnesota. He is a former recipient of the Civil Servant of the Year Award from the Federal Executive Board of Minnesota and of the Historical Moment Award from the Kansas Organic Geochemistry Research Group. Rutherford is a research chemist for the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver. Hiatt is a research chemist in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Exposure Research Laboratory, in Las Vegas. The holder of two patents, Hiatt received the Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Achievement Award in Chemistry in 1998 and its Scientific Technical Achievement Award in 1996 and 1999.


State-of-the-Art of Civil Engineering Award

 
Sennah


Kennedy


Khaled Sennah and John B. Kennedy are the winners of the State-of-the-Art of Civil Engineering Award for their paper “State-of-the-Art Design of Curved Box-Girder Bridges,” which appeared in the May/June 2001 issue of the Journal of Bridge Engineering. The State-of-the-Art of Civil Engineering Award is presented to the person or persons whose written work best summarizes the current level of knowledge in a particular area. The paper honored this year draws on the most important sources related to the development of current specifications for the design of straight and curved box girder bridges. Sennah is an associate professor in the civil engineering department at Ryerson University, in Toronto. A 1999 winner of ASCE’s Arthur M. Wellington Prize, he was also awarded the 1997–98 Governor General’s Gold Medal, the 1997 P.L. Pratley Award, the 1999–2000 Ryerson Merit Award, and Ryerson University’s 2002 GREET Teaching Award. Kennedy’s career encompasses more than 45 years in engineering practice, teaching, and research. His research has covered the analysis and design of skew bridges, waffle slab bridges, and reinforced-soil metal structures for small-span bridges, for which he received a patent. He has published more than 100 technical papers and has written three books. Currently an emeritus professor at the University of Windsor, he won ASCE’s Arthur M. Wellington Prize in 1995 and 1999 and its T.Y. Lin Award in 1982.


Harold R. Peyton Award for Cold Regions Engineering

Tart
 

Rupert G. Tart, Jr., wins the Harold R. Peyton Award for Cold Regions Engineering in recognition of his unstinting efforts in promoting the theory and practice of permafrost engineering. The Peyton award is presented to the member of the Society who has made outstanding contributions to this field in the form of published work. Tart was named engineer of the year in 1985 by ASCE’s Anchorage Branch. Currently a principal and senior consultant for Golder Associates, Inc., he is also a consultant to the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company on geotechnical, permafrost, rock slope, and seismic issues.


CAN-AM Civil Engineering Amity Award

 
Morgenstern


Norbert R. Morgenstern receives the CAN-AM Civil Engineering Amity Award for his leadership in geotechnical engineering in relation to dams, tailings, landslides, slope stability, foundations, and pipelines. The CAN-AM award is bestowed on a member of ASCE or the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering either for a particular act that has furthered understanding and goodwill between the two countries or for a career of exemplary professional activity that has contributed to international amity. An emeritus professor at the University of Alberta, Morgenstern has authored nearly 300 research publications on the geotechnical aspects of oil sands development, permafrost engineering, dams, mine waste management, progressive ground failure, landslides, risk analysis, and the numerical modeling of geotechnical structures. His current research deals with probabilistic methods of slope stability analyses and their calibration through geotechnical practice. This has been coupled with the development of risk analysis procedures for landslide assessment. Morgenstern has been the recipient of more than 40 major honors and awards, including honorary degrees from the University of Toronto and Queen’s University, and he has delivered the prestigious Rankine, Terzaghi, Casagrande, Rocha, and Lumb lectures.


Computing in Civil Engineering Award

Barnwell
 

Thomas O. Barnwell, Jr., is the recipient of the Computing in Civil Engineering Award for his extraordinary leadership in the advancement of computing in civil engineering through government and Society service. This award was established to recognize outstanding achievements and contributions related to the application of computers to the practice of civil engineering. Barnwell is a senior science adviser at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Center for Environmental Research, in Washington, D.C. His honors include the Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Achievement Award in Water Quality in 1992, its Science Achievement Award in Earth Sciences in 1994, and the Federal Engineer of the Year Award in 1993. 6


Construction Management Award

 
Wagner


Harold W. Wagner, Jr., is the winner of the Construction Management Award for his dedication to the education of civil engineers, be they students or mature professionals, as he combines an enthusiastic passion for education with a lifetime of real-world experience. The Construction Management Award is presented to a member of the Society who has made a signal contribution in applying the theoretical aspects of engineering economics, statistics, probability theory, operations research, and related mathematical disciplines to problems of construction management, estimating, cost accounting, planning, scheduling, and financing. Wagner has been a lecturer in the civil engineering department at the University of Missouri at Rolla (UMR) since January 1996. He serves as the faculty adviser for students considering careers in the construction industry, and he advises the Associated General Contractors of America’s student chapter. Wagner received the 2002 Faculty Achievement Award from the UMR’s Academy of Civil Engineers and the 1997 Outstanding Teaching Award from the university’s civil engineering department. In 1998 he was honored with the Legion of Merit for service to the United States, in particular his contributions to the modernization of Fort Drum.


Thomas Fitch Rowland Prize

Bank


Gentry


Nuss


Lamanna


Duich


Lawrence Bank, Thomas Russell Gentry, Kenneth H. Nuss, Stephanie H. Hurd, Anthony J. Lamanna, Stephen J. Duich, and Ben Oh receive the Thomas Fitch Rowland Prize for their paper “Construction of a Pultruded Composite Structure: Case Study,” which appeared in the August 2000 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Composites for Construction. The Thomas Fitch Rowland Prize recognizes papers that describe in detail completed works of construction or make valuable contributions to construction management or construction engineering. Bank is a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and the editor in chief of the Journal of Composites for Construction. In 1999 he was awarded ASCE’s Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize, and in 2001 he received the Society’s Richard R. Torrens Award. Gentry is an associate professor of architecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the associate director of the school’s Advanced Wood Products Laboratory. His research has focused on the development and characterization of advanced composite materials and structures. His accolades include the Modern Plastics Best Overall Paper Award in 1994 and the Outstanding Teacher Award in 2000. Nuss is a research associate at the Strategic Investment Group in Arlington, Virginia. Lamanna is an assistant professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at Tulane University. Duich is the director of the acquisition and business services division of AEPCO, Inc., a multidisciplinary engineering and consulting firm headquartered in Rockville, Maryland. He is the recipient of various military personal and campaign awards, among them the Legion of Merit.


Theodore von Karman Medal

Caughey
 

Thomas K. Caughey is the recipient of the Theodore von Karman Medal for his pioneering contributions and sustained leadership in developing tools for dealing with challenging problems in engineering science. The Theodore von Karman Medal is presented to an individual to signalize distinguished achievements in engineering mechanics that are applicable to any branch of civil engineering. Caughey is the Hayman Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. His monograph General Theory of Damped Linear Systems was adopted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as their basic text on vibrations. His honors include ASCE’s Alfred M. Freudenthal Medal in 1994 and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Den Hartog Award in 1995.


Nathan M. Newmark Medal

 
Soong


Tsu T. Soong has been named the recipient of the Nathan M. Newmark Medal for his pioneering work, innovations, and leadership in the theory and applications of structural control systems in civil infrastructure facilities. The Newmark medal is bestowed upon a member of the Society who through contributions to structural mechanics in the form of papers or other written works has substantially strengthened the scientific base of structural engineering. Soong is a professor of engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo and since 1989 has occupied the Samuel P. Capen chair. His research has dealt with structural dynamics and safety, in particular innovative ways of ensuring structural stability under such destructive environmental loads as wind, earthquakes, and waves. Soong is the author or coauthor of eight books and about 240 publications. His honors include the Senior U.S. Scientist Award from the Humboldt Foundation (Humboldt Prize) in 1987 and 1992, the AGC Build San Diego Award in 1997, and ASCE’s Norman Medal in 1999.


Alfred M. Freudenthal Medal

Grigoriu
 

Mircea D. Grigoriu wins the Alfred M. Freudenthal Medal for his original developments and theoretical work facilitating the application of probabilistic methods to civil engineering. The Freudenthal medal is presented to an individual in recognition of distinguished safety and reliability studies that are applicable to any branch of civil engineering. Grigoriu’s novel theoretical contributions include translation and other non-Gaussian models for loads and material properties, solutions of linear and nonlinear dynamic systems subjected to non-Gaussian excitations, and local methods for solving solid mechanics problems. A professor at Cornell University, Grigoriu edits ASCE’s Journal of Engineering Mechanics. His many honors include a research prize from the International Association for Structural Safety and Reliability in 1993 for his work on non-Gaussian processes.


Simon W. Freese Environmental Engineering Award

 
Snoeyink



Vernon L. Snoeyink receives the Simon W. Freese Environmental Engineering Award for his significant fundamental and applied contributions to the advancement of drinking water treatment, especially activated carbon absorption technology. The winner of this award is invited by ASCE’s executive director to deliver the Simon W. Freese Environmental Engineering Lecture at an appropriate meeting of the Society. Snoeyink’s research and writings have focused on the science and engineering of drinking water treatment and distribution, including processes for the removal of toxic and odorous organic compounds, and on the chemistry of water distribution. A coauthor of the text Water Chemistry, Snoeyink is the Ivan Racheff Professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois. He received the American Water Works Association’s Research Award in 1988 and ASCE’s Samuel Arnold Greeley Award in 1995. Elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1998, Snoeyink was named a distinguished lecturer by the American Association of Environmental Engineers in 2001.


Samuel Arnold Greeley Award

Stocking


Kavanaugh




 

Andrew J. Stocking and Michael C. Kavanaugh garner the Samuel Arnold Greeley Award for their paper “Modeling Volatilization of MTBE from Standing Surface Waters,” published in the December 2000 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Environmental Engineering. The Greeley award is given to the author or authors of a paper dealing with the design, construction, operation, or financing of a water supply, pollution control, storm drainage, or refuse disposal project. The paper honored this year describes the development of a fate and transport model for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in surface waters that proved to accurately predict transient MTBE concentrations resulting from certain types of recreational activity. Stocking is director of strategic partnerships at Care2.com, Inc., in Menlo Park, California. In March 2000 he became the first recipient ever of the Paul L. Busch Prize. Kavanaugh, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is a vice president of Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., in Emeryville, California.


Rudolph Hering Medal

Li


Gyürék


Finch


Smith


Belosevic


Hanbin Li, Lyndon L. Gyürék, Gordon R. Finch, Daniel W. Smith, and Miodrag Belosevic are this year’s winners of the Rudolph Hering Medal for their paper “Effect of Temperature on Ozone Inactivation of Cryptosporidium Parvum in Oxidant Demand-Free Phosphate Buffer,” which appeared in the May 2001 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Environmental Engineering. The Hering medal is awarded to the author or authors of a paper deemed to make a valuable contribution to the environmental branch of the engineering profession. The paper signalized this year reported a kinetic model for the ozone treatment of Cryptosporidium, a protozoan that in recent years has been responsible for outbreaks of disease in, among other countries, Canada and the United States. Li works in Canada for Earth Tech, Inc., as a water and wastewater treatment engineer. Gyürék is a senior environmental engineer for the city of Edmonton, Alberta. In 1999 he received a doctoral dissertation academic award from the American Water Works Association. Finch, now deceased, was a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Alberta. He was best known for his disinfection work with ozone and other disinfectants in water and wastewater, and he had more than 100 technical publications to his credit. His accolades included the 1999 Harvey Rosen Prize from the International Ozone Association, best-paper awards in the journal Ozone: Science and Engineering in 1997 and 1998, the 1988 Keefer Medal from the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering, and the 1987 Andrew Stewart Graduate Prize from the University of Alberta. Smith is a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Alberta. His awards include the Keefer Medal from the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (CSCE) and an award in 1997 for a paper in the Canadian Journal for Civil Engineering. In 1988 he won the CSCE’s Albert E. Berry Medal, and the following year he was named the recipient of ASCE’s CAN-AM Civil Engineering Amity Award and the Elbert F. Rice Memorial Lecturer Award. Belosevic is a professor of biological sciences at the University of Alberta. His numerous accolades include the 2002 Wardle Medal from the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the 2001 Killiam Annual Professorship from the Killiam Trust and the University of Alberta, the 2000 McCalla Professorship from the University of Alberta, and the 1998 Harvey M. Rosen Award from the International Ozone Association.


Wesley W. Horner Award

Ahyerre
 
 
Saad


Cheebo


Mathieu L. Ahyerre, Mohamed Saad, and Ghassan S. Cheebo win the Wesley W. Horner Award for their paper “Nature and Dynamics of Water Sediment Interface in Combined Sewers,” which appeared in the March 2001 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Environmental Engineering. The Horner award is bestowed on the author or authors of a paper deemed to have made a valuable contribution to the environmental engineering profession, with preference given to authors who are in the private practice of engineering. Ahyerre is a research engineer for the Seine Normandie Water Agency in Nanterre, France. His research focuses on storm-water quality modeling and project financing. Saad is a research engineer at the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in France. Cheebo is the director of research at the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées. The author of numerous publications, Cheebo is the head of six scientific programs dealing with the pollution of urban water.


Wilbur S. Smith Award

Barry


 

Thomas F. Barry, Jr., is the recipient of the Wilbur S. Smith Award for his outstanding contributions to highway engineering throughout Florida on behalf of the Florida Department of Transportation, where he has served as secretary of transportation, assistant secretary of transportation responsible for finance, and district secretary and has also held positions in project management, finance, and design and traffic operations. The Smith award is conferred on the person judged to have enhanced the role of the civil engineer in highway engineering. Barry is the secretary of transportation in Florida.


Francis C. Turner Lecture

 
Hendrickson


Chris T. Hendrickson has been chosen as the person who will deliver the Francis C. Turner Lecture in recognition of his leadership in the fields of transportation engineering and construction management, his energetic support of ASCE, and his intellectual enthusiasm and scholarship. The Turner lectureship is awarded on the basis of an individual’s contributions to the advancement of the theory and practice of transportation engineering. Hendrickson is the Duquesne Light Company Professor of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and head of the civil and environmental engineering department there. He has coauthored two textbooks and two monographs and has published numerous articles. His accolades include the Fenves Systems Research Award in 2002, ASCE’s Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award in 1994, the Outstanding Professor of the Year Award from ASCE’s Pittsburgh Section in 1990, ASCE’s Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize in 1989, and the Benjamin Richard Teare Teaching Award from the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1987.


Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award

Radwan
 

A. Essam Radwan wins the Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award in recognition of his innovative research on the application of computer simulation in solving problems in highway traffic operations and transportation planning, his numerous publications, and his dedicated service to ASCE. The Masters award is bestowed on a member of the Society who produces the best example of innovative or noteworthy planning, design, or construction in the area of transportation. Radwan has been the chair of the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Central Florida since 1990, and in 1998 he was also appointed director of the Center for Advanced Transportation Systems Simulation. He received the Distinguished Research Award of the Year from the civil and environmental engineering department for the year 2001–02, and the president of the University of Central Florida recognized his work with a certificate of appreciation.


Charles Martin Duke Lifeline Earthquake Engineering Award

 
Nyman


Douglas J. Nyman has been accorded the Charles Martin Duke Lifeline Earthquake Engineering Award for his many published contributions to the practice of lifeline earthquake engineering, particularly the work Guidelines for the Seismic Design of Oil and Gas Pipeline Systems, of which he was the principal author, for his many years of service to ASCE’s Technical Council on Lifeline Earthquake Engineering, and for the contributions that he continues to make to the practice of lifeline earthquake engineering. The Duke award is given to an individual whose contributions are seen as advancing art, science, or technology as it relates to lifeline earthquake engineering. Nyman, who is recognized nationally and internationally as an expert in the mitigation of earthquake, geotechnical, and man-made hazards for oil and gas pipeline systems, is a consulting engineer and principal of D.J. Nyman & Associates, of Houston. In 2001 the University of Illinois honored him with its Distinguished Alumnus Award.


Stephen D. Bechtel Pipeline Engineering Award

Kienow
 

Kenneth K. Kienow has been named the recipient of the Stephen D. Bechtel Pipeline Engineering Award for his lifelong achievements in the pipeline field, his active participation in professional affiliations, and his many years of service to ASCE’s Pipeline Division. The Bechtel pipeline award recognizes an ASCE member who through research, planning, design, or construction has advanced the art, science, or technology of pipeline engineering. Kienow is the president of Kienow Associates, Inc., in Big Bear Lake, California. The author of more than 40 papers, he received the Richard C. Longfellow Award from the American Concrete Pipe Association in 1977 and ASCE’s Wesley W. Horner Award in 1984.


Surveying and Mapping Award

 
Foster


Robert W. Foster has been named the winner of the Surveying and Mapping Award in recognition of his more than three decades of leadership within the surveying and mapping profession locally, nationally, and globally. This award is made annually to a member of ASCE who has made a significant contribution to surveying and mapping through teaching, writing, research, planning, design, construction, or management. Foster retired from Schofield Brothers, Inc., in 1991, and since then has provided dispute resolution services in mediation as well as expert testimony, primarily in negligence cases against engineers and surveyors. In addition, he continues to participate on projects with Schofield Brothers of New England, Inc. Foster has numerous publications to his credit. In 2001 he was honored with the Engineering Center Leadership Award and made an honorary member of the Czech Union of Surveyors and Cartographers.


Harland Bartholomew Award

Cohn
 

Louis F. Cohn receives the Harland Bartholomew Award for his contribution to the editorial panel of ASCE’s Journal of Urban Planning and Development and his work on noise abatement around the country. The Bartholomew award is conferred upon a Society member who is deemed to have enhanced the role of the civil engineer in urban planning and development. Cohn was a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Louisville from December 1984 to June 1993 and from July 1994 to June 2002. The author of more then 80 research papers and two books, he has been invited to lecture in a dozen countries around the world. He twice won the Outstanding Paper Award from the Transportation Research Board’s Committee on Transportation Related Noise and Vibration. In 1985 Cohn was named the recipient of ASCE’s Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize, and in 1997 he won its Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award.


Ven Te Chow Award

 
Delleur


Jacques W. Delleur is the winner of the Ven Te Chow Award for his fundamental contributions in hydraulic time series and urban hydrology modeling and control and for his dedicated and unselfish services to the hydrology profession and education. Established in 1995, the Ven Te Chow Award recognizes individuals who in their careers in hydrologic engineering have made significant contributions in research, education, or practice. Delleur is a professor emeritus in the School of Civil Engineering at Purdue University. He has authored or coauthored more than 60 refereed publications, 70 nonrefereed publications, and 60 reports. A fellow of the Indiana Academy of Sciences, he has been the recipent of the Senior Scientist Exchange Award from the National Science Foundation and the Charles Harold Beckert Award from the Indiana Water Resources Association.


Hunter Rouse Hydraulic Engineering Lecture

Ettema
 

Robert Ettema has been chosen as the person who will deliver the Hunter Rouse Hydraulic Engineering Lecture. The selection is based on his contributions in hydraulics in the areas of winter navigation, alluvial channel stability, flow rate estimation, flooding, the stability and operation of various hydraulic structures, the winter environment of rivers, and the effects of ice on hydropower. The winner of this honor is invited by the executive director to deliver the Hunter Rouse Hydraulic Engineering Lecture at an appropriate meeting of the Society. Ettema is the chairman of the University of Iowa’s civil and environmental engineering department. A paper he wrote on ice formation and problems in heavily trafficked ice-covered navigation channels was awarded the Gustave Willems Award in 1991 by the United States section of the Permanent International Association for Navigation Congresses.


Royce J. Tipton Award

 
Burt


Charles M. Burt is the winner of the Royce J. Tipton Award for developing methods of improving irrigation performance that are now used worldwide; for his teaching, training, and research in irrigation; for establishing California Polytechnic State University’s Irrigation Training and Research Center (ITRC), and for disseminating practical irrigation knowledge. The Tipton award is given to a member of the Society who has made a significant contribution to irrigation and drainage engineering through written work, long years of service, or particular actions. Burt is a professor of irrigation in the bioresource and agricultural engineering department at California Polytechnic State University and the founder and chairman of the university’s ITRC. The books he has authored deal with drip and microirrigation design; fertigation, that is, the application of nutrients through irrigation systems; and surface irrigation. Burt received the Person of the Year Award from the Irrigation Association in 1997 and the Irrigation Person of the Year Award from the California Irrigation Institute in 1999.


Arid Lands Hydraulic Engineering Award

Singh
 

Vijay P. Singh receives the Arid Lands Hydraulic Engineering Award in recognition of his leadership and his exceptional research contributions to erosion and sediment transport in upland watersheds, the hydrodynamic modeling of watershed runoff, and the analysis and modeling of surface and subsurface water transport in semiarid and arid environments. The Arid Lands Hydraulic Engineering Award is given in recognition of original contributions in hydraulics, hydrology, climatology, planning, irrigation, drainage, hydroelectric power development, or navigation that have special relevance to arid or semiarid climates or of contributions to the understanding and development of new technology in river basins. Singh is the A.K. Barton Professor at Louisiana State University. The author of ten books, 35 book chapters, 300 journal articles, and 250 papers published in conference proceedings and the editor of 35 books, he has received more than 30 awards, among them the Distinguished Service Award from the National Research Council of Italy in 1995, the Fulbright Scholar Award in 1998, the Brij Mohan Distinguished Professor Award in 1999, the Distinguished Faculty Award in 1999, the J.M. Todd Technological Achievement Award from the Louisiana Engineering Society in 2000, and the Distinguished Alumni Award from Colorado State University in 2001.


 
Zedler
Street


Karl Emil Hilgard Hydraulic Prize

Emily A. Zedler and Robert L. Street have been named the recipients of the Karl Emil Hilgard Hydraulic Prize for their paper “Large-Eddy Simulation of Sediment Transport: Current over Ripples,” which appeared in the June 2001 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Hydraulic Engineering. The Hilgard prize is presented to the author or authors of the paper that is judged to be of superior merit in dealing with a problem of flowing water, either in theory or in practice. Zedler is pursuing a doctorate in environmental fluid mechanics and hydrology at Stanford University. Street is the William Alden and Martha Campbell Professor at Stanford University. He is the author of the text The Analysis and Solution of Partial Differential Equations and a coauthor of Elementary Fluid Mechanics. Street received ASCE’s Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize in 1972 and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ R.T. Knapp Award in 1986.


Hydraulic Structures Medal

Melville




 

Bruce W. Melville is the winner of the Hydraulic Structures Medal for research that has led to comprehensive advances in the understanding of scour processes and in the development of practical scour design methodologies for bridge piers and abutments. The Hydraulic Structures Medal is awarded to individuals for significant contributions to the advancement of the art or science of hydraulic engineering as applied to hydraulic structures. Melville is the head of the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Auckland, in New Zealand. A coauthor of the text Bridge Scour, he has been an associate editor of ASCE’s Journal of Hydraulic Engineering since 1993.


Hans Albert Einstein Award

 
Lee


Baum K. Lee receives the Hans Albert Einstein Award for his worldwide reputation and outstanding accomplishments as a practitioner in the field of sedimentation engineering. The Hans Albert Einstein Award is given to a member who has made a significant contribution to the engineering profession in the area of erosion control, sedimentation, or waterway development through teaching, research, planning, design, or management. Lee is the chief hydrologist for Montgomery.


J.C. Stevens Award

Matos


 

Jorge Matos wins the J.C. Stevens Award for his paper “Hydraulics of Skimming Flow on Modeled Stepped Spillways,” which appeared in the December 2000 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Hydraulic Engineering. The Stevens award is given to the author of the best discussion published by the Society in the field of hydraulics, including fluid mechanics and hydrology. The paper honored this year is based on research on air entrainment and energy dissipation in skimming flow over stepped spillways. Matos is an assistant professor at the Technical University of Lisbon, in Portugal. His previous honors include the Portuguese Water Resources Association Award.


Julian Hinds Award

 
Pinder


George F. Pinder receives the Julian Hinds Award for his pioneering, sustained, and preeminent contributions to the science and practice of groundwater modeling and numerical solution methods and to the design of groundwater remediation strategies and groundwater quality management. The Hinds award is given to recognize the author or authors of a paper judged to embody the most meritorious contribution to the field of water resources development. The winner may also be chosen on the basis of notable performance, long years of distinguished service, or particular actions that have served to advance engineering as it relates to the planning, development, and management of water resources. Pinder is a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Vermont. His honors include the American Geophysical Union’s RCA Professor of Energy Resources Award and Horton Award and the Geological Society of America’s O.E. Meinzer Award. In addition, he has been the recipient of the Eminent Scientists Award Medal and was named a University of Vermont University Scholar in recognition of his contributions to research and scholarship.


International Coastal Engineering Award

Bruun


 

Per M. Bruun receives the International Coastal Engineering Award for his pioneering work in coastal engineering, in particular beaches and tidal inlets, and for his efforts in building academic programs in the field. This award is given to an individual who has made significant contributions to coastal engineering through design work, teaching, professional leadership, research, or planning. Now retired, Bruun’s academic career included positions at the Technical University of Denmark, the University of Florida, and the Norwegian Institute of Technology. His publications include several books and more than 150 scientific and engineering papers. He is a member of the Danish Academy of Technical Sciences and the Norwegian Academy of Technical Sciences and was accorded the title Knight of the Icelandic Falcon in 1994. Bruun holds honorary doctorates from universities in Spain and Iceland, and in 2001 he received the Coastal Award from the international organization Coastal Dynamics.


Ralph B. Peck Award

 
Bea


Robert G. Bea receives the Ralph B. Peck Award for his pioneering work on deep foundation design for offshore structures and for introducing an engineering-based philosophy in reliability assessments of marine systems. The Peck award is presented for outstanding contributions to the geotechnical engineering profession through the publication of case histories or of recommended practices or design methodologies based on case histories. Bea is a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of California at Berkeley. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has been the recipient of many honors, including the Bechtel Fellow Award in 1987 and ASCE’s J. James R. Croes Medal in 1978.


H. Bolton Seed Medal

Youd


 

T. Leslie Youd has been named the winner of the H. Bolton Seed Medal for his many important contributions to education, research, and consulting in earthquake engineering, liquefaction, and seismic-related ground failure, his leadership in postearthquake investigations and evaluations, his contributions to site instrumentation in earthquake-prone areas, and his many publications and presentations, particularly his publications on practical procedures for evaluating liquefaction resistance and lateral spread displacement. The Seed medal is awarded for outstanding contributions to geotechnical engineering through teaching, research, or practice. Youd is a professor in the civil engineering department at Brigham Young University. In 1992 he received the Karl G. Maeser Research and Creative Arts Award from Brigham Young University, and in 1995 he was named Utah engineering educator of the year by the Utah Engineers Council and ASCE’s Utah Section.


Karl Terzaghi Lecture

 
Milligan


Victor Milligan has been chosen to deliver the Karl Terzaghi Lecture. The selection was made in recognition of his expertise in embankment construction and tunneling and his achievements in founding and building a world-renowned international geotechnical firm. The winner is invited by the executive director to deliver the Karl Terzaghi Lecture at an appropriate meeting of the Society. Before his retirement in 1994, Milligan served as president, chief executive officer, and chairman of the company he helped to found, Golder Associates. Now a consultant for Golder, he serves on consulting boards for international clients. The author of more than 50 technical papers, he was one of the founders and the first editor of the Canadian Geotechnical Journal. His numerous honors include honorary doctorates from the University of Waterloo and the Queen’s University of Belfast. He received the Julian C. Smith and K.Y. Lo medals from the Engineering Institute of Canada, the Beaubian Award from the Association of Consulting Engineers of Canada, and the R.F. Legget Award from the Canadian Geotechnical Society. Milligan was recently elected a fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering.


Thomas A. Middlebrooks Award

Aubeny
 
 
Whittle


Ladd


Charles P. Aubeny, Andrew J. Whittle, and Charles C. Ladd have been named the winners of the Thomas A. Middlebrooks Award for their paper “Effects of Disturbance on Undrained Strengths Interpreted from Pressuremeter Test,” which appeared in the December 2000 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering. The Middlebrooks award is conferred on the author or authors of a paper published by the Society that is judged worthy of special commendation for its contribution to geotechnical engineering, with papers written by young engineers given preference. Aubeny is an assistant professor in the civil engineering department at Texas A&M University. In 2001 he wrote a keynote paper for the 10th International Conference for Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechanics. Whittle is a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The author of more than 60 papers in refereed journals and conferences, he has received numerous awards, among them ASCE’s Arthur Casagrande Professional Development Award in 1994, its J. James R. Croes Medal in 1994, its Thomas A. Middlebrooks Award in 1997, and its Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize in 1998. Ladd, a professor emeritus at MIT, is self-employed as a geotechnical consultant. Elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1983, he has been honored with ASCE’s Norman and J. James R. Croes medals, and in 1986 he was chosen to deliver the Karl Terzaghi Lecture.


Martin S. Kapp Foundation Engineering Award

DiMillio


 

Albert F. DiMillio receives the Martin S. Kapp Foundation Engineering Award for his many contributions to innovative foundation engineering and site improvement through his work at the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and for the numerous practical innovations that have resulted from his efforts and been instrumental in overcoming difficult foundation problems. The Kapp award is conferred on an individual for providing the best example of innovative or outstanding design or construction relating to foundations, earthworks, retaining structures, or underground endeavors. As a geotechnical research program manager for the FHWA in McLean, Virginia, DiMillio oversees and organizes the work of research professionals involved in highly complex studies in geotechnical areas where previous research is either incomplete or nonexistent. His publications include more than 40 papers, articles, and technical reports, and his accolades include the NOVA Award from the Construction Innovative Forum and ASCE’s James Laurie Prize.


Arthur Casagrande Professional Development Award

 
Rathje


Ellen M. Rathje has been named the winner of the Arthur Casagrande Professional Development Award for her outstanding achievements in research, education, and service related to soil dynamics and earthquake engineering. The Casagrande award is presented in recognition of outstanding accomplishments as evidenced by written work in the field of geotechnical engineering. Rathje is an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research work has encompassed the seismic response of solid waste landfills, postearthquake investigations regarding site effects and coastal ground failures during the 1999 earthquake in Turkey, and the development of an in situ dynamic testing procedure that induces and measures liquefaction behavior. Her honors include the Engineering Foundation Young Faculty Award from the University of Texas and ASCE’s H. Bolton Seed Medal.


Ernest E. Howard Award

Cermak




 

Jack E. Cermak receives the Ernest E. Howard Award for his pioneering research in wind engineering and his contributions to the assessment of wind effects on man’s built environment. The Howard award is conferred upon a member of the Society who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of structural engineering through research, planning, design, or construction. Cermak is the president of Cermak Peterka Peterson, Inc., in Fort Collins, Colorado, and a professor emeritus at Colorado State University. The author or coauthor of more than 670 papers and reports, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1973.


Jack E. Cermak Medal

 
Kareem


Ahsan Kareem wins the Jack E. Cermak Medal for his long-term leadership in wind engineering and the application of industrial aerodynamics to structural systems. The Cermak medal is given to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to research or practice in the area of wind engineering. Kareem is the Robert M. Moran Professor of Engineering at the University of Notre Dame and the chair of the civil engineering and geological sciences department there. He also directs Notre Dame’s NatHaz Modeling Laboratory, which investigates the dynamics of tall buildings, long-span bridges, and deepwater offshore systems. Kareem received the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the White House Office of Science and Technology in 1984.


Shortridge Hardesty Award

Birkemoe


 

Peter C. Birkemoe is the winner of the Shortridge Hardesty Award for his substantial contributions to the field of structural stability during his 30 years of active research efforts and for his continued leadership within the Structural Stability Research Council. The Hardesty award is conferred on a member of the Society who has contributed substantially in applying the results of fundamental research to the solution of practical engineering problems in the field of structural stability. Birkemoe is a professor in the civil engineering department at the University of Toronto. He has conducted research and published “benchmark experiments” on weld-fabricated tubular members as beam-columns for offshore applications and has carried out analytical modeling of the behavior of severely damaged tubular members. His work in this area won him the Duggan Medal from the Engineering Institute of Canada.


T.Y. Lin Award

Noppakunwijai


Tadros


Ma


Mast


Panya Noppakunwijai, Maher K. Tadros, Zhongguo “John” Ma, and Robert F. Mast are the winners of the T.Y. Lin Award for their paper “Strength Design of Pretensioned Flexural Concrete Members at Prestress Transfer,” which appeared in the January/February 2001 issue of the PCI Journal. The T.Y. Lin Award is presented to the author or authors of a paper that deals with prestressed concrete in a meaningful fashion, with preference given to papers written by younger authors. Noppakunwijai is a research assistant in the civil engineering department at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. In 2001 the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI) honored him and his coauthors with the Martin P. Korn Award for a paper they wrote. Tadros is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and a founding partner of the structural engineering firm Tadros Associates, LLC, which is based in Omaha, Nebraska. He has a large number of publications to his credit and has received a number of awards, including the inaugural PCI Distinguished Educator Award in 1995. Ma is an assistant professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks (UAF). The author of more than 20 papers, he received the UAF’s Silver Yarn Teaching Award in 2001 and the PCI’s Martin P. Korn Award, also in 2001. Mast is a cofounder, senior principal, and director of engineering development at BERGER/ABAM Engineers, Inc., in Federal Way, Washington. In 2001 he received ASCE’s Outstanding Projects and Leaders (OPAL) Lifetime Achievement Award for Design, the Engineer of the Year Award from the Consulting Engineers Council of Washington, and the Medal of Honor from PCI. He received the T.Y. Lin Award twice before, in 1969 and 1973, and he was twice honored with the PCI’s Martin P. Korn Award. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1989.


 
Folz


Filiatrault


Moisseiff Award

Bryan R. Folz and Andre Filiatrault receive the Moisseiff Award for their paper “Cyclic Analysis of Wood Shear Walls,” which appeared in the April 2001 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Structural Engineering. The Moisseiff Award is given to the author or authors of an important paper published by the Society dealing with the broad field of structural design, including applied mechanics, as well as the theoretical analysis or improvement of such engineering structures as bridges and frames. The paper honored this year describes the development of a numerical model for the cyclic analysis of wood shear walls. Folz is an instructor at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. In 1993 he received the Gzowski Medal for a paper he published in the Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering. Filiatrault is professor of structural engineering at the University of California at San Diego. He too is a former winner of the Gzowski Medal, and he has also been honored with France’s Roberval Prize.


Raymond C. Reese Research Prize

Wen


Yeo


 

Y.K. Wen and Gee Liek Yeo receive the Raymond C. Reese Research Prize for their paper “Design Live Loads for Passenger Car Parking Garages,” which appeared in the March 2001 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Structural Engineering. The Reese prize is awarded to the author or authors of a paper that describes a notable achievement in research related to structural engineering. Wen is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research work has focused on load modeling, structural reliability analysis, reliability, and performance-based design, and he has more than 60 journal papers to his credit. His accolades include ASCE’s Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize and its Moisseiff Award, and in 1997 he was awarded a research prize by the International Association of Structural Safety and Reliability. Yeo, a graduate student researcher at Stanford University, has received numerous fellowships and scholarships.


George Winter Award

 
Nair


R. Shankar Nair receives the George Winter Award for his many engineering achievements and for his active participation in support of a variety of social issues as well as history and cultural activities in the Chicago area. The Winter award is conferred on a structural engineer who has consistently worked to advance the state of the art of the profession through the practical application of design or research studies and has demonstrated, through work performed in an area not directly related to engineering or science, a commitment to the social and artistic needs of the community. For more than 30 years Nair has focused on structural engineering for large architectural and civil engineering projects. Active as a researcher and lecturer, he has published numerous technical papers on various aspects of structural analysis and design and has lectured around the world. He has received more than 30 awards from professional and trade organizations, including four “prize bridge” awards from the American Institute of Steel Construction and six innovation awards from the Structural Engineers Association of Illinois.


Richard R. Torrens Award

Rasdorf




 

William J. Rasdorf receives the Richard R. Torrens Award in recognition of his exemplary work as editor of the Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering. The Torrens award is conferred on volunteer editors who make outstanding contributions to ASCE’s publications program. Rasdorf is a professor at North Carolina State University. His accolades include the 1998 George H. Blessis Outstanding Undergraduate Advisor Award from North Carolina State University and a 1985 Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation. He received ASCE’s Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize in 1990 and its Computing in Civil Engineering Award in 2001.


Excellence in Journalism Award

 
Glanz


James Glanz receives the Excellence in Journalism Award for his contributions to coverage of the collapse of the World Trade Center towers and the ongoing efforts to strengthen tall buildings against terrorist attack. This journalism award is given annually to a reporter or reporters whose news coverage enhances public understanding of civil engineering. Glanz and his colleagues at the New York Times produced a series of insightful articles on the technical aspects of the buildings’ collapse and on subsequent recovery and rebuilding efforts. The comprehensive reporting, unbiased analysis, and excellent supporting graphics contributed to a thorough and accurate understanding of the engineering issues. Glanz joined the New York Times in 1999.


Daniel W. Mead Prize for Students

Larson


 

Tamara N. Larson is the winner of the Daniel W. Mead Prize for Students for her paper “The Evolution of Engineering Ethics during the Last 150 Years.” The Daniel W. Mead Prize for Students is awarded to the author or authors of what is judged to be the best paper on professional ethics. Larson is a student at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. A cochair of ASCE’s first national student conference, which was held this year in June, she was awarded a scholarship by the Madison chapter of the organization Women in Construction in 2001.


Robert Ridgway Student Chapter Award

 
Younger Member Forum of the West Virginia Section


The West Virginia University Institute of Technology takes the Robert Ridgway Student Chapter Award for the outstanding way in which it conducted its affairs as a student chapter of ASCE. The Ridgway award is conferred on only one student chapter. The West Virginia University Institute of Technology chapter did exemplary work in organizing community service endeavors, professional activities, and special projects. This is the second year in a row that the chapter has taken this award. In 2000 it won the Zone II Vice Presidents Award for Chapter Activity.


Collingwood Prize

Tingle


 

Jeb S. Tingle wins the Collingwood Prize for his paper “Engineering Properties of Sand-Fiber Mixtures for Road Construction,” which appeared in the March 2001 issue of ASCE’s Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering. The Collingwood Prize is awarded to an author or authors under 35 years of age whose paper describes an engineering project with which the author or authors are directly connected; alternatively, the paper may record an investigation contributing to engineering knowledge to which the author or authors have contributed an essential part. The paper signalized this year provides a demonstration of the balance between fundamental research and application through the development of discrete synthetic fibers for road construction applications. It also describes a laboratory research effort carefully designed to isolate the effect of independent variables on the reinforcement potential of fiber-reinforced sands. Tingle is a research civil engineer in the Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The primary author or coauthor of more than 30 technical papers and reports, he received the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Director’s Research and Development Achievement Award for his work on developing fiber stabilization technology.


Daniel W. Mead Prize for Younger Members

 
Nakano


Victor M. Nakano has been named the winner of the Daniel W. Mead Prize for Younger Members for his paper “Ethics and Civil Engineering: Past, Present, and Future.” The Mead prize for younger members is awarded to the author or authors of a paper on professional ethics. Each year the particular topics for the contest are selected by the Committee on Younger Members. A major in the U.S. Army Acquisition Corps, Nakano is an instructor in the civil and mechanical engineering department at the United States Military Academy, where he teaches structural analysis.


Edmund Friedman Young Engineer Award for Professional Achievement

Huff


Miller


Lau


Evans


Tony Huff, Pamela G. Miller, Tony C.G. Lau, and Molly F. Evans share the Edmund Friedman Young Engineer Award for Professional Achievement for their significant professional achievements in service to the profession and the Society, having demonstrated evidence of technical competence and integrity, outstanding leadership qualities, and a strong commitment to public service. The Friedman award is made to younger members of ASCE (35 years of age or younger) who are judged to have attained significant professional achievements by virtue of their technical competence, high integrity, and service to the public. Huff is with the firm Tony Huff & Associates. He helped to start the Kentucky Engineering Exposure Network, a group of engineers who talk to students about the engineering profession and potential careers. His accolades include the Daniel V. Terrell Award from ASCE’s District 9 Council in 1995 and the Daniel W. Mead Prize in 1996. Miller, a project engineer at Dubroc Engineering, Inc., in Lafayette, Louisiana, received the Outstanding Young Civil Engineer Award from ASCE’s Louisiana Section in 2000. Lau, a project engineer at Hawaii Pacific Engineers, Inc., in Honolulu, was named Hawaii’s young engineer of the year for 2002. He received the Western Regional Younger Member Council’s Outstanding Younger Member in an ASCE Activity Award in 1996 and 1999, and in 1994 and 1996 he received awards for being a top membership recruiter. Evans is a project manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Her accolades include the Outstanding Young Civil Engineer Award from ASCE’s Louisiana Section and New Orleans Branch and Tulane University’s Frederick Fox Award.


Younger Member Group Award

 
Younger Member Forum of the Los Angeles Section


The Younger Member Forum of the Los Angeles Section takes the Younger Member Group Award for Large Groups for its outstanding accomplishments on behalf of the Los Angeles Section. The awards for younger member groups recognize groups whose efforts are seen as markedly advancing the goals of the section. As evidenced by their merits and achievements during the past year, the Younger Member Forum of the Los Angeles Section provides excellent opportunities for members to get involved in ASCE activities early in their careers. It enables participants to hone their leadership, organizational, and communication skills and to interact with the community in a constructive way. In addition, it offers an inexpensive nine-week review course for the professional engineer’s exam, and it works with the section’s branches and with local companies to organize informative technical tours of local projects. The Younger Member Forum of the West Virginia Section takes the Younger Member Group Award for Small Groups. The group’s members bring the engineering message to students at area high schools, and during the past year they worked closely with students in connection with the West Point Bridge Design Contest and the MathCounts program in West Virginia. Members of the forum paired up with local teams to mentor and coach the students after school.


Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize

Culver


Lansey


Boulanger


Bullock


Tommelein


Teresa B. Culver, Kevin E. Lansey, Ross W. Boulanger, Darcy M. Bullock, and Iris D. Tommelein each receive the Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize. These prizes are awarded to members of the Society for notable achievements in research related to civil engineering, with preference given to younger members. Culver, who is with the civil engineering department at the University of Virginia, is recognized for her research on the simulation and management of water quality, including analysis of optimal groundwater remediation design techniques and the development of models for sorptive contaminant transport. Her honors include a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation. Lansey receives the award for his research on the application of systems analysis techniques to the design and operation of water resources systems, in particular his work on water distribution systems. His research has focused on methodologies for optimizing the design and operation of water resources systems. Boulanger, a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at the University of California at Davis, receives the award for his research on dynamic soil properties, on assessing and mitigating the potential for liquefaction, and on the interactions between soil, piles, and structures during earthquakes. Bullock is recognized for his work in developing a traffic controller interface device—for which he received a patent—and his efforts to educate practitioners and educators on the device’s application. His teaching and research interests are in the general area of real-time traffic control. Tommelein, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, receives the award for her research on the use of computers to manage project-based production systems in the architecture, engineering, and construction industry.


Alfred Noble Prize

 
Cassel


Kevin W. Cassel receives the Alfred Noble Prize for his paper “A Comparison of Navier Stokes Solutions with the Theoretical Description of Unsteady Separation,” which appeared in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. The Noble prize is conferred on a member of ASCE, the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, or the Western Society of Civil Engineers for a technical paper of exceptional merit, provided the author has not passed his or her 35th birthday at the time that the paper is submitted. Cassel is an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology. His accolades include the Philip Thomas Medal of Excellence, the Army Research Office Young Investigator Award, and the Ralph L. Barnett Excellence in Teaching Award.


Civil Government Award

Brown


 

Kirk Brown receives the Civil Government Award for being an outstanding role model for civil engineers in government service, for his extensive contributions to civil engineering education, and for the professional guidance he has given to young civil engineers. The Civil Government Award recognizes those members of the engineering profession who have rendered meritorious service in elective or appointive positions in government. As secretary of the Illinois Department of Transportation, Brown directs the state agency responsible for planning, developing, maintaining, funding, and operating a transportation network that is among the most extensive in size and level of service in the nation. Brown received the Illinois Society of Professional Engineers’ Professional Engineering Management Award in 1998, the Amtrak President’s State Partner Award in 2000, and the Illinois Asphalt Paving Association Man-of-the-Year Award in 1992.


John I. Parcel–Leif J. Sverdrup Civil Engineering Management Award

 
O’Neil


Robert S. O’Neil receives the John I. Parcel–Leif J. Sverdrup Civil Engineering Management Award for his more than four decades of outstanding contributions to the field of civil engineering management, for his ability through his leadership and integrity to inspire others to strive for excellence, and for the benefits that his major transportation projects have conferred on society. The Parcel-Sverdrup award is given to a member of ASCE who has made a significant contribution to the field of civil engineering management through written work or outstanding performance. O’Neil recently served as president and chief executive officer of Parsons Transportation Group, an operating group of the Parsons Corporation, of Pasadena, California. He is the president of the U.S.-China Transit Group, a confederation of U.S. companies dedicated to marketing and providing planning, engineering, and equipment supply services for transportation projects in China. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he received ASCE’s James Laurie Prize in 1995 and the College of Engineering Honor Award from the University of Notre Dame in 1988.


Edmund Friedman Professional Recognition Award

Lenard


 

John F. Lenard receives the Edmund Friedman Professional Recognition Award for his long-term contributions to the civil engineering profession through his work in improving employment conditions for engineers, upgrading the professional aspects of civil engineering education, and providing professional guidance to young civil engineers. The Edmund Friedman Professional Recognition Award is presented to a member of the Society who is judged to have contributed substantially to the status of the engineering profession by establishing a reputation for professional service. Lenard is the president of Lenard Engineering, Inc., in Storrs, Connecticut, and has a number of publications to his credit. He received the University of Connecticut’s Department of Civil Engineering Alumni Award in 1994, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Senior Project Award in 1995, and the School of Engineering Distinguished Service Award in 1996. ASCE’s Connecticut Section recognized his achievements with its Benjamin Wright Award in 2000.


Civil Engineering History and Heritage Award

 
Florman


Samuel C. Florman receives the Civil Engineering History and Heritage Award in recognition of the effect that his books, columns, and speeches have had in conveying to a wide audience the multifaceted challenges associated with practicing civil engineering in the modern world. The history and heritage award is presented to those persons who, through writing, research, or other efforts, have made outstanding contributions to a better understanding and appreciation of the role that civil engineering has played in history. Florman is a building contractor in the New York City area. He has many publications to his credit, and his work The Existential Pleasures of Engineering has been used as a text in college courses. His numerous honors and awards include the Stevens Honor Award from the Stevens Institute of Technology (1976), the Ralph Coats Roe Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1982), the Robert Fletcher Award from Dartmouth’s Thayer School of Engineering (1983), the Award for Distinguished Literary Contributions Furthering Engineering Professionalism from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (1990), and the Sterling Olmstead Award from the American Society for Engineering Education (1993).


William H. Wisely American Civil Engineer Award

LeFevre


Padgett.


 

E. Walter LeFevre and J.A. “Jay” Padgett, Jr., win the William H. Wisely American Civil Engineer Award for their work on revising the Society’s constitution and bylaws. The Wisely award recognizes individuals or groups of individuals who are members of ASCE and who have made a sustained effort to promote an appreciation of the history, tradition, developments, and technical and professional activities of the Society. LeFevre is a professor emeritus at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Although retired, he continues to teach and assist in research procurement. The recipient of the university’s College of Engineering Medallion, he was named Arkansas’s engineer of the year in 1980. In addition, he received the Distinguished Service Award from the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying in 1994 and an award from the National Society of Professional Engineers in 1996 in recognition of his leadership in the profession and his lifelong commitment to excellence in engineering. Padgett is the president and owner of GeoServices tion in 1985.


ASCE Presidents’ Award

 
Galloway


Gerald E. Galloway, Jr., receives the ASCE Presidents’ Award for his exemplary service to the Society while pursuing a distinguished career in the military and federal government. The ASCE Presidents’ Award is given to a member of the Society who is deemed to have rendered distinguished service to his or her country. A retired U.S. Army brigadier general as well as a civil engineer, public administrator, and geographer, Galloway has served as a consultant to the Executive Office of the President and has assisted such organizations as the U.S. Water Resources Council, the World Bank, the Organization of American States, Tennessee Valley Authority, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in water resources activities. In addition to the Army Distinguished Service Medal, he holds a number of military medals and campaign ribbons. He received the Bliss Medal from the Society of American Military Engineers in 1991, the Silver DeFleury Medal from the Army Engineer Association in 1995, and the Goddard-White Award from the Association of State Floodplain Managers in 1998. 51


ASCE President’s Medal

Ressler


 

Stephen J. Ressler receives the ASCE President’s Medal for his work in developing the West Point Bridge Designer Software, the West Point Bicentennial Engineering Design Contest, and the associated text. The ASCE President’s Medal recognizes the accomplishments of eminent engineers and their contributions to the profession, the Society, or the public. Ressler, a colonel in the U.S. Army, is a professor at the United States Military Academy, where he is the deputy head of the civil and mechanical engineering department. The winner of three best-paper awards from the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), he received the Dow Outstanding Faculty Award from the Middle Atlantic section of the ASEE in 1997, the EDUCOM Medal for educational software development in 1998, the Distinguished Educator Award from the Middle Atlantic section of ASEE in 2000, the NEEDS Premier Award for Excellence in Engineering Courseware in 2000, and the Norman Augustine Award for Outstanding Achievement in Engineering Communications in 2001.


Hoover Medal

 
Thornton


Charles H. Thornton receives the Hoover Medal for his contributions to the design of major structures worldwide and his work in educational outreach programs. The Hoover Medal, instituted to commemorate the civic and humanitarian achievements of the American president Herbert Hoover, is awarded on the basis of distinguished public service. Thornton is the chairman of the Thornton-Tomasetti Group, Inc. In 1995 he founded the ACE Mentor Program, a not-for-profit organization whose mission was to enlighten and motivate high school students toward careers in architecture, construction, and engineering. The program is designed to attract young people, particularly minorities, women, and the less privileged, into colleges and engineering programs. In addition to his work with ACE, he is the president of the Salvadori Center in New York City, a nonprofit organization that educates over 2,000 middle school students each year in mathematics and science by utilizing architectural and engineering principles. The recipient of numerous honors, Thornton was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1997 and received Engineering News-Record’s Award of Excellence in 2001.


Roebling Award

Henn




 

Raymond W. Henn receives the Roebling Award in recognition of his many years of dedicated, innovative, and effective service to the heavy construction industry. Established in memory of three outstanding constructors—John A. Roebling, Washington Roebling, and Emily Roebling—the Roebling Award recognizes and honors an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of construction engineering. Henn is vice president and director of construction services for Haley & Alrich, Inc., in Denver. His publications include four professional papers and two textbooks, one being the Practical Guide to Grouting Underground Structures.